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Design Two Beautiful Typographic Wine Labels


WHAT WEโ€™RE CREATING:

Hey Design Cutters!

Jo here and I’m so excited to play around with the current font bundle, which is chocked full of beautiful, scripted fonts. We’re going to break away from the usual outcome for this one and design a couple of eye-catching wine labels: one red, one white. If you’re anything like me and are a bit of a sucker for the bottle packaging, hopefully you’ll enjoy this! ๐Ÿ™‚

Ok, let’s get started!

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Follow along with this tutorial: Download the freebies

As always, we have another great freebie for you to enjoy. Many of these fonts have some great extra resources that come with them and compliment your font collections perfectly. We’ve taken a versatile selection of these which you can use in your work.

Remember, this freebie is just a tiny sample taken from this great bundle: 21 Best Selling Beautiful Fonts (With Web Fonts and Extended Licensing) at just $29 (a whopping 97% Off). This all new and exclusive font bundle brings you 21 of the worldโ€™s most popular creative fonts, along with web fonts, extended licensing and tons of artistic extras. This is your chance to own some of the best quality fonts of our time – there’s no filler in here, just a hall-of-fame style collection of some of the most popular creative fonts in the world!

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Quick note: In this tutorial, the term “clipping” or “clipped layer” is used a few times. This means that the layer is only visible/applies to the layer directly below it. You can very quickly do this by holding ‘Alt’ down on your keyboard and clicking between the two layers. Here’s a quick demonstration.

Step 1:

Open up a new 940px x 1840px Photoshop document.

In the main menu, go to View > New Guide and enter the following settings, one at a time, to set up some border references for our canvas:

Vertical: 2%, 98%
Horizontal: 3%, 97%

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We’ll be using a few additional resources to help with this tutorial, so let’s download these first:

Grungy Paper Texture 1

Grungy Paper Texture 2

Misty Mountains Photo

2 Lil Owls Textures and Papers Sample Pack

Now we’re ready to start creating our first label design!

Step 2:

Paste the ‘Grungy Paper Texture 1’ image on to your canvas, transforming to fit:

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Next, paste the ‘Misty Mountains Photo’ file on to the canvas, scaling so that the image height matches that of the canvas. Move the image so that the right hand side is framed, similar to below, and change the blend mode to multiply:

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Duplicate the ‘Grungy Paper Texture 1’ layer, so that it sits above the photo, then change the blend mode to soft light:

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From the freebies, copy and paste SuperSecretBonus_Texture.png on to your canvas, transforming to fit:

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We’ll make this a bit more subtle by changing the blend mode to color burn and reducing the opacity to 22%:

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Next up, copy and paste the ‘Grungy Paper Texture 2’ file on to your canvas, again transforming to fit:

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Switch the blend mode to multiply, and drop the opacity to 53%:

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Duplicate the layer, then change the blend mode to lighten and drop the opacity all the way down to 10%:

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From the ‘2 Lil Owls Textures and Papers Sample Pack’ select the 2LO Thru the glass 6 file and paste it on to your canvas, transforming to fit:

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Switch the blend mode to soft light to soften the effect:

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Finally, we’ll adjust the saturation to create a more neutral background to work with. Create a new clipped, hue/saturation adjustment layer with the following settings:

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Hue/Saturation Settings:
Colourize: On
Hue: 0
Saturation: 0
Lightness: -10

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Now that we have a nice, rustic background to work from, group the layers in to a folder called “Background” to keep things easy to find.

Step 3:

From the background, we’re going to move to the foreground! In this step, we’ll be locking the layers to the top so we can see the final effect as we create our piece.

Duplicate the ‘Grungy Paper Texture 1’ layer, making sure the blend mode is set to multiply, and changing the opacity to 75%:

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Duplicate the ‘Super Secret Bonus Texture’ layer, making sure the blend mode is still color burn and increase the opacity slightly to 33%

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Are you getting a sense of deja-vu yet? ๐Ÿ˜‰

Duplicate the ‘Grungy Paper Texture 1’ layer again, this time changing the blend mode to screen:

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We’ll get our image back by creating a clipped, hue/saturation adjustment layer with the following settings:

Hue/Saturation Settings:
Colourize: On
Hue: 0
Saturation: 0
Lightness: 0

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Above this, create a clipped invert adjustment layer to get the desired ‘screen’ effect:

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Pop these in to a new group folder called “Foreground” and lock it to the top of your layer stack.

Ok, we’re now good to go with the fonts!

Step 4:

From the freebie vector file, select the following:

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Copy and paste this on to your Photoshop canvas, transforming to fit within the guides we set up earlier. Keep the height of the line fairly narrow when you transform it:

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We’re going to download another resource here which we’ll be using to add some great texture to our vectors and fonts:

Gold texture

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Copy and paste this on to your canvas, so that a fairly dark area covers the top line:

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Once you’re happy with the position, clip it to the layer below:

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We’ll give this a nice deep merlot colour by creating a clipped, hue/saturation adjustment layer with the following settings:

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Hue/Saturation Settings:
Colourize: On
Hue: 0
Saturation: 60
Lightness: -40

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Step 5:

from the freebie vector file, copy and paste the following on to your Photoshop canvas:

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duplicate both the gold texture and clipped hue/saturation adjustment layer we previously created, and apply it to the “The” vector. You’ll need to re-clip them to the right layer and move the gold texture to a position where you get the effect you like over the text, but this all ensures the tone stays consistent, and it’s nice and easy to do!

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We’ll now use our first font from the bundle, Voyage Bold Regular, which is a nice, bold, chunky font – perfect for the robust, full-bodied merlot we’re promoting. Using the following settings, type “Big”:

Font Settings:
Font: Voyage Bold Regular
Style: none
Colour: #1e160e
Size: 465pt (approx)

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We’re going to make the most of the alternative letters available with this font by selecting the “ig” and going in to the character panel and switch on the stylistic alternatives:

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Using these features allow us to really tailor the fonts to suit our design, as well as help provide some variety within the same font family to give a more organic look.

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To add a bit of interest, duplicate the text and move it below the original layer. Change the blend mode to soft light and nudge the layer slightly down and to the right to create a subtle shadow effect:

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Duplicate the duplicate layer, and nudge to the left and up to essentially ‘frame’ the original text with the subtle shadow effect:

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Put these two layers in to a folder called “Shadow ‘Big'”. Duplicate one of the layers that features the gold texture and place it above the group, but below the original text:

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Then, clip the layer to the group:

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We’ll tone this down slightly by creating a clipped, hue/saturation adjustment layer with the following settings:

Hue/Saturation Settings:
Colourize: On
Hue: 35
Saturation: 65
Lightness: -35

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Step 6:

From the vector freebies, copy and paste the following ampersand on to your Photoshop canvas:

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As before, create a copy of the layer and change the blend mode to soft light. Move it below the original layer and nudge slightly to the right and down. We’re going to create a letterpress effect with a highlight and shadow surrounding the ampersand, and this is the highlight. To make it lighter, create a clipped, hue/saturation adjustment layer and move the lightness all the way up to +100.

Duplicate the layer for the shadow (without the adjustment layer), nudging it upwards and to the left. Check that the blend mode is still soft light and you should see a slightly darker outline :

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Note:It’s worth remembering this technique, as we’ll be using it a lot throughout the tutorial.

Duplicate a copy of the gold texture and clip it to the original ampersand layer for a gold, embossed effect:

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Step 7:

We’ll keep building up the text and working with it to fit our design. For all these text layers, we’ll set the blend mode to multiply.

The next font we’re using from the main bundle is Amelian Script Regular in the colour #550505, at around 700pt. Type an uppercase “B” and check the stylistic alternatives in the character panel to get the following version:

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Next, type “ol” and manually scale and position the text so that it sits between the “B” loop of the “g” in “Big”:

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And finally, do the same for the final letter “d”:

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Breaking down words to manipulate the individual letters, or groups of letters is a simple, yet effective way of working with fonts and helps put the focus back on them as visual elements, rather than text.

If you do this though, it’s handy to group everything together, so let’s do that now and put those layers in to a folder called “Bold”. ๐Ÿ™‚

We’ll add a bit of interest to this text by giving it a slight ‘bleed’. Duplicate the group, move it below the original and nudge it slightly down and right:

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Change the blend mode of the group to soft light:

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Duplicate the duplicate group and move so that it’s slightly above and to the left of the original text:

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Step 8:

From the freebie vectors, copy and paste the following on to your Photoshop canvas:

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Duplicating the gold texture and hue/saturation adjustment layer combo we used for the outline of “Big”, clip these to the shape to create what’ll be our gold logo for the wine, since it looks a bit like a corkscrew!

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Use the same technique we did for the gold ampersand to create an embossed effect, using the soft light blend mode and clipped hue/saturation adjustment layers.

Step 9:

Next we’re going to use one of the main fonts, The Carpenter Pictograms to get a very cool diamond icon. With the colour set as #2c241e and size approximately 250pt, type a percentage symbol “%”:

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This looks good, but is quite fine in comparison to the overall “big and bold” message we’re going for. As this is viewed by Photoshop as a glyph/font we can easily adjust the thickness! Select the glyph and in the character panel, turn on the ‘faux bold’ effect:

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Instant boldness. ๐Ÿ˜‰

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Duplicate the layer and move to the opposite side to create a mirror image:

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Step 10:

Next we’ll type “Merlot” with the following settings:

Font Settings:
Font: Everglow Regular
Style: none
Colour: #000000
Size: 310pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Multiply

Manually scale so that the width matches the guides we set earlier:

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Duplicate one of the gold texture layers, clipping it to the text:

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Above that, create a clipped, brightness/contrast adjustment layer and push the contrast all the way up to 100:

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Then above that, create a clipped hue/saturation adjustment layer with the following settings:

Hue/Saturation Settings:
Colourize: On
Hue: 0
Saturation: 45
Lightness: -75

Use the same technique as before to duplicate the original text and create an embossed effect. There’s no need for a hue/saturation adjustment layer on this one – just use soft light for the highlight text and multiply for the shadow:

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Step 11:

We’ll now add some of the descriptive text. From the vector freebies, select the letters “AN” from the “AND”, then copy and paste them on to your Photoshop canvas, setting the layer blend mode as multiply:

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We’ll create a clipped, hue/saturation adjustment layer with the following settings to soften the colour:

Hue/Saturation Settings:
Colourize: On
Hue: 340
Saturation: 75
Lightness: +20

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For the rest of the description, we’ll type the following, scaling as necessary to fit:

Font Settings:
Text: “Adventurous”
Font: Everglow Regular
Style: none
Colour: #efaf49
Size: 465pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 90%

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Font Settings:
Text: “Blend”
Font: Lulo Outline
Style: none
Colour: #1e160e
Size: 38pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 100%

To reduce the space between the letters in the word “BLEND” change the tracking to -100. Thi keeps the font more in-keeping with the other narrower typefaces we are using here.

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From the freebies vector file, copy and paste the “Of” catchword on to your Photoshop document:

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Create a clipped, hue/saturation adjustment layer with the following settings to give it a richer, slightly green colour:

Hue/Saturation Settings:
Colourize: On
Hue: 50
Saturation: 60
Lightness: -45

Step 12:

We’ll continue writing the description with some more fonts from the bundle, thinking about the personality each typeface adds to the word:

Font Settings:

Text: “Spicy”
Font: Kiln Sans Spiked
Style: Spiked
Colour: #efaf49
Size: 85pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 65%

Text: “Plummy”
Font: Very Berry Pro Regular
Style: none
Colour: #4e0707
Size: 110pt
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 100%

For the word “Plummy”, use the duplicate, soft light and multiply blend mode technique to create a letterpress effect to help the text stand out:

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Text: “Flavours”
Font: Kiln Serif Regular
Style: regular
Colour: #d8ccbd
Size: 70pt
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 100%

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Arrange and scale the text so that they’re approximately the same height, and fit between the border guides.

Group all these together in to a folder called “Description”, and we’re ready to start adding some of the final details…

Step 13:

The layout has left us with the perfect space to add our vintage year – let’s go for a nicely matured 2008. ๐Ÿ™‚

Font Settings:
Text: “2008”
Font: Lulo Clean Four
Style: Four
Colour: #790000
Size: 117pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Multiply
Opacity: 100%

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Duplicate the layer, and update the settings to the following:

Font: Lulo Clean Three
Style: Three
Colour: #8e0707
Size: 117pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 100%

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Duplicate one of the gold texture layers and clip it to the text:

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We’ll make this a little more subtle by adding a clipped, hue/saturation layer with the following settings:

Hue/Saturation Settings:
Colourize: On
Hue: 33
Saturation: 25
Lightness: +35

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Group these layers together in to a folder called “2008” to keep everything neat and easy to find.

Step 14:

Whilst we’re looking at filling some awkward spaces, let’s go back to the slight gap between the end of “Bold” and the edge of our border.

From the freebie vectors, copy and paste the following wine bottle image on to your Photoshop canvas:

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Note how the tip of the tail on the “g” looks a bit like its dripping in to the bottle!

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Duplicate the gold texture and clipped hue/saturation layer that we used at the start on the line at the top of the design. You may need to re-clip it to the bottle graphic:

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Duplicate the original bottle layer twice to create a letterpress effect using the soft light blend mode technique. Remember to add the hue/saturation clipped layer for the highlight in this one:

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Step 15:

We’re now on to the final stages of our label! From the freebie vectors, copy and paste the following on to your Photoshop canvas, scaling to fit within our border guides:

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Duplicate one of our gold texture layers, then position and clip it to the vector line:

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We’ll use the spaces either side of the curves to add some vital info – the volume and alcohol percentage.

We’ll start with the percentage:

Font Settings:
Text: “14% vol”
Font: Everglow Regular
Style: none
Colour: #ecddcb
Size: 90pt
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 71%

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We’ll use some of Photoshop’s character editing properties to quickly and proportionately reduce the size of the “vol” part of the text.

With the relevant text highlighted, go to the character panel and turn on the ‘superscript’ option:

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Reposition the text if needed so that it sits nicely in the curve:

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Finally, we’ll add the volume:

Font Settings:
Text: “750ml” (use ‘superscript’ for the “ml”)
Font: Everglow Regular
Style: none
Colour: #ecddcb
Size: 90pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Overlay
Opacity: 100%

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Duplicate the layer, then change the blend mode to screen, and reduce the opacity to 70% to get the desired vibrancy:

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That gives us our big and bold merlot label!

Step 16:

For you white wine lovers, there’s also the resources provided to do a brighter, lighter version for a Riesling. ๐Ÿ™‚

As the techniques are very much the same, I’ll go through the first steps to create the background and provide the details of the fonts. All the vectors are also included in the freebies for you to use.

Set up the new document the same way we did as for the red: 940px x 1840px

In the main menu, go to View > New Guide and enter the following settings, one at a time, to set up some border references for our canvas:

Vertical: 2%, 98%
Horizontal: 3%, 97%

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Again, we’ll need to grab a few extra resources to use:

Bright Sky Photo

Blue Green Canvas

Silver Foil Texture

Once downloaded, keep them in a handy place to refer back to.

Step 17:

Paste the ‘Bright Sky’ photo on to the canvas, scaling so that the height matches. Position the image so that the far right of it is framed:

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Copy and paste the ‘Blue Green Canvas’ file on to your document, scaling to fit:

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Change the blend mode to soft light for a nice, fresh glow:

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Copy and paste the ‘Grungy Paper Texture 1’ file from the red wine label document, changing the blend mode to soft light and reducing the opacity to 49%:

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Again from the red wine label document (or from the freebies) copy and paste the ‘Secret Bonus Texture’ file, scaling to fit, and changing the blend mode to soft light, opacity 100%:

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Put all these layers together in to a group called background for easy finding.

Step 18:

We’ll now create our foreground texture to be locked at the top of the layer stack.

Duplicate the ‘Grungy Paper Texture 1’ layer and set the blend mode to multiply, opacity 100%:

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Duplicate the layer again and change the blend mode to screen. Rasterize the layer, then invert it by pressing ‘cmd + I’ on a mac, or ‘Alt + I’ on the keyboard.

Create a clipped, hue/saturation adjustment layer with the following settings:

Hue/Saturation Settings:
Colourize: On
Hue: 0
Saturation: 0
Lightness: 0

Step 19:

The main design of the label uses the same techniques, such as the clipped textures and hue/saturation adjustment layers, plus the duplicate layers and blend modes to create a bit of interest around the text such as using different colours or adding a letterpress-like effect.

Most of the text can be adjusted manually in size to fit the design and layout, so I’ll give approximate sizes here since due to the free transforming of much of the text, there are some rather obscure point sizes!

Font Settings:

Text: “the” (type “d”)
Font: Macarons Catchwords
Style: catchwords
Colour: #efebe1
Size: 200pt
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 100%

Text: “Light” (‘stylistic alternative’ turned on for the “h”)
Font: The Carpenter Regular
Style: regular
Colour: #959463
Size: 340pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 100%

Text: “&”
Font: Very Berry Pro Regular
Style: regular
Colour: #6894a6
Size: 200pt
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 100%

Text: “F”
Font: Caferus Regular
Style: regular
Colour: #6894a6
Size: 620pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 100%

Text: “ruity”
Font: Caferus Regular
Style: regular
Colour: #6894a6
Size: 248pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 100%

Text: “Riesling”
Font: Rushistly Regular
Style: regular
Colour: #959463
Size: 320pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Multiply
Opacity: 100%

Text: “2008”
Font: Very Berry Pro
Style: regular
Colour: #a58b5e
Size: 175pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Multiply
Opacity: 100%

Text: “With” (type “I”)
Font: Macarons Catchwords
Style: catchwords
Colour: #6894a6
Size: 215pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Multiply
Opacity: 100%

Text: “a”
Font: Kathya Regular
Style: regular
Colour: #a58b5e
Size: 215pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Multiply
Opacity: 70%

Text: “soft”
Font: Isabella Script Regular
Style: regular
Colour: #efebe1
Size: 200pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 80%

Text: “appley” (‘stylistic alternatives’ turned on)
Font: VeryBerry Pro Regular
Style: regular
Colour: #959463
Size: 150pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Multiply
Opacity: 100%

Text: “flavour”
Font: Cresilda Script Regular
Style: regular
Colour: #6894a6
Size: 150pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Multiply
Opacity: 100%

Text: “14% vol” (‘superscript’ on “vol”, ‘stylistic alternatives’ turned on)
Font: Cresilda Script Regular
Style: regular
Colour: #6894a6
Size: 150pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 80%

Text: “750ml” (‘superscript’ on “vol”, ‘stylistic alternatives’ turned on)
Font: VeryBerry Pro Regular
Style: regular
Colour: #bfd1cd
Size: 120pt (approx)
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 80%

And that’s the font list!

And weโ€™re done!

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I hope you enjoyed doing this tutorial and it gave you the opportunity to see how these great fonts can be used together, and how to get the most out of them along with the many extras that compliment them.

Remember to share your designs on the Facebook page too, as we love being inspired by the way you make these tutorials your own. It’d be great to see which are your favourite fonts from the bundle too – are you more of a big and bold style fan, or a lighter and brighter? ๐Ÿ˜‰

Hopefully this tutorial showed you just some of the ways you can use the huge variety of fonts available in this bundle, and got to know them a little better. Remember, there’s just a few days left to get 97% off these 21 beautiful fonts:

21 Best Selling Beautiful Fonts (With Web Fonts and Extended Licensing)

4 Lovely Comments from our Community:

  1. Mary Beth says:

    Great tutorial! Just a quick question. Do ALL of the files included as freebie downloads in your tutorials have the same license agreement as your “Deals.” I’m asking because I don’t like to download anything to my computer that I can’t use in my commercial designs because of copyright.

    • Tina Muller says:

      Hey Mary Beth,

      Absolutely. All our freebies have the same licensing as our main bundles, so you can safely use them in your commercial work.

  2. Simon Hartmann says:

    Neat ideas and execution. It sure goes away from the typical wine labels.

    • SJ Duff says:

      Thanks so much for taking the time to leave a comment Simon :).

      Your kind words are really appreciated!

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